American Gold Eagle Coins

Buy Gold American Eagle Coins

The American Gold Eagle coin is the official gold currency of the United States. It is issued annually in three distinct designs and four different weights. With a total gold weight of one troy ounce and a hardened 22-karat gold composition, Gold American Eagle Coins contain silver and copper as well as the guaranteed soft gold metal content. Because of this, the gold coin is extremely resistant to flaws and cuts, which can occur on coins that are more purified. Coins made from .9999 pure gold.

These magnificent coins serve as a poignant memento of the greatness, tenacity, and perseverance of the United States of America. The United States Mint's Gold Eagle coins contain representations of the nation's most recognizable symbols, from the American bald eagle, the official national emblem, to Lady Liberty, the towering symbol of freedom and democracy.

22k gold coins are insured by the US government and enforced by the US Secret Service and are available in various weights (1/10 ounce, 1/4, 1/2 and 1 ounce).

The American Gold Eagle's History

In the United States, the American Gold Eagle Coin is the official gold bullion coin. The US Mint uses 400 oz gold bar stock at its West Point Mint branch to actively strike and release these coins.

With the enactment of the Gold Bullion Coin Act in 1985, the United States Congress authorized the manufacturing of American Gold Eagle Coins. The program was mandated by law to offer four different weights (1 ounce, 12 ounce, 14 ounce, and 1/10 ounce) and initially feature two separate versions (bullion and proof). In accordance with usual practice for legal money issued by the United States Mint, Congress fixed the face value of the coins in question.

In 1986, the first batch of American Gold Eagle coins was struck and put on the market for purchase. All four weights of the bullion program were instantly accessible, however the proof version of the coin only had a 1 ounce coin in production in 1986. After the introduction of the 12-ounce proof coin in 1987, the proof program was expanded to include the 14-ounce and 10-ounce coins in 1988.

In 2006, the United States Mint released a new burnished edition of the American Eagle coin series, which includes the Silver Eagle. Coin enthusiasts now have a new coin to lust after: the American Gold Eagle Burnished. Burnished versions of the Gold Eagle are more valuable to numismatists because of the unusual minting method used to create them.

Design and Appearance

The design of the American Eagle Gold coin is based on the iconic Lady Liberty portrait by Saint-Gaudens, which also featured on the Gold Double Eagle. The Saint-Gaudens Gold coin, which replaced the Liberty Gold coin in 1907, was a result of President Theodore Roosevelt's goal for U.S. Gold coins to be works of art. As with the 1907 Gold Double Eagle, the modern American Eagle is lauded for being one of the most beautiful U.S. coins ever struck. The Gold, Silver, Platinum, and Palladium American Eagle coins include classic representations of symbolic patriotism.

Roman numeral dates appear on Gold Eagles struck between 1986 and 1991. When it came to date Gold Eagles, the United States Mint adopted Arabic numerals in 1992.

Except for the marks on the reverse side indicating weight and face value, the 1/10, 1/4, and 1/2 troy oz coins look exactly like the 1 troy oz coin. As a result, the print on the smaller coins is finer and harder to read than on the bigger ones.

American Gold Eagle Coin Types

The American Gold Eagle comes in two varieties. Uncirculated [BU] strikings are more prevalent, however proof versions of the coin are also available. A buyer should assume these gold coins are uncirculated (BU) unless the listing specifically specifies they are proof coins or circulated coins.

The 22-karat gold alloy, also known as "crown gold," is an English standard. There had been no usage of Crown gold alloys in US coins since 1834, and the gold content had reduced to a standard of 0.900 fine in US gold coins since 1837. The gold content of American Gold Eagles was increased to .9167 percent, up from .91 percent previously (22 karat ).

Bullion Gold Eagle Coins

The American Gold Eagle bullion coin is the most popular item in the lineup. Since its release in 1986, it has been made available by the United States Mint every year in all four weights. Over the past three decades, the mintage of gold coins has followed a pretty typical up-and-down pattern.

1.3 million people wanted the 1 oz coin when it was launched in 1986, and the demand for the 12 oz, 14 oz, and 1/10 oz pieces was 599,000. During the 1980s and early 1990s, demand for the coins dwindled until rising again in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Between 2000 and 2008, mintage figures for gold eagles fell sharply, with mintage figures ranging from 1.49 million to 110,000 to 110,000 to 270,000 for one-tenth-ounce coins, depending on the size of the coin.

Proof Gold Eagle Coins

Proof gold coins are a great investment for numismatists who like building their personal gold coin collections. The intrinsic value of a coin differs significantly between bullion and proof versions. All U.S. government-issued American Gold Eagle coins, regardless of design or finish, have a face value equal to the weight of gold in them.

Multiple strikes are used on specially prepared planchets to create the American Gold Eagle Proof coins, giving them their collectible shine. Proof Gold Eagles have a superb finish thanks to the dies used in this process, which give the coins a mirror-like look with the device appearing to hover above the liquid field. Gold Eagle coin collectors frequently choose this particular edition due to the superb quality and collectability.

While the demand for Proof Gold Eagles has risen and fallen, the actual mintage has fluctuated far less dramatically than that of bullion coins in numeric terms. While the mintage of bullion coins has decreased by more than a million over the past five years, the mintage of proof coins has remained roughly the same, ranging from lows of 12,000 to highs of 45,000 coins per kilogram. Mintage levels have just recently surpassed those upper limits in recent years.

What is the Gold American Eagle's Millesimal Fineness?

In the composition of coins, bars, and other precious metals products, millesimal fineness is a system used to express the purity of the gold [or other precious metals]. A purity of .999 would be deemed 99.9 percent pure because it is measured in parts per thousand. The term "24 karats" can refer to the amount of gold in a piece.

The American Gold Eagle is required by law to have a purity of .9167 ounces. This means that the United States provides 91.67 percent of the gold used in the coin. To increase their longevity, these coins are minted using a combination of 5.33 percent copper and 3 percent silver. As a result, the coin is officially designated as "crown gold," or 22 karats pure. The US Congress authorizes each American Gold Eagle, which is supported by the US Mint in terms of weight and content. As a result, they're incredibly sought for. There's no doubt about their product's quality. As well as the words "In God We Trust" and the motto "E Pluribus Unum," the reverse of each coin features an image of the venerable American eagle.

Values

These coins have face values of $5, $10, $25, and $50, but their actual selling price (buying power) fluctuates based on the current spot gold price. As opposed to normal bullion, these are their legal values, which represent their issuance and monetized value as "Gold Dollars." At face value, they are accepted as legal money for all debts, public and private. The face value of these coins does not reflect their true value, which is substantially higher and mostly determined by their mass and the current precious metal price.. U.S. Mint sold a 2016 one-ounce coin ($50 face value) for $1,510.00 on September 13, 2019.


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